Mistaken Point – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 13

This 150 things about Canadian palaeontology post is going to focus on the most recent fossil-related UNESCO World Heritage Site in Canada – Mistaken Point, Newfoundland and Labrador. Starting at 94/150: 94. Mistaken Point, on the island of Newfoundland, was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2016, just last year. It was first discovered in … More Mistaken Point – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 13

Current Canadian Palaeos (2) – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 12

A few weeks ago, I introduced you to a few current Canadian (or at least working in Canada) palaeontologists. Obviously there are more than just the 8 that I mentioned last time. Here is Part 2 of some of the palaeontologists in Canada, again in no particular order. Starting with 86/150: 86. The Royal Ontario … More Current Canadian Palaeos (2) – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 12

Significant Canadian fossils – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 11

For those that haven’t been following this post, here’s a brief recap. This year on July 1 is Canada’s 150th birthday. To celebrate, I’m writing 150 things about Canadian palaeontology, ranging from sites to people to museums. This post is going to focus on some of the important fossils that have been found in Canada, … More Significant Canadian fossils – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 11

Joggins Fossil Cliffs – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 10

This week, I’m going to introduce you to the 3rd of 5 UNESCO World Heritage Sites based on palaeontology that are found in Canada, the Joggins Fossil Cliffs. Starting at 70/150: 70. Joggins Fossil Cliffs is located on the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia, where more than 15 km of fossil-bearing cliffs and coastline are exposed. … More Joggins Fossil Cliffs – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 10

Palaeontology Museums – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 9

Things have been a bit hectic since I’ve arrived in Japan, so I missed last week’s post! Oops. But hopefully I can continue now, uninterrupted. This week I’m going to talk about some of the museums around Canada where you can see fossils. Starting at 57/150 (more than a third of the way there!): 57. … More Palaeontology Museums – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 9

150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 6 – marine fossils #FossilFriday

Last week I introduced you to one of the most famous fossil sites in Canada, Dinosaur Provincial Park. Generally speaking when people think of Canadian fossils, they think of dinosaurs and the large creatures that roamed the land during the Mesozoic and are commonly found in Alberta and Saskatchewan. However, marine fossils are also common … More 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 6 – marine fossils #FossilFriday

150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 5 – Dinosaur Provincial Park #FossilFriday

Post number 5 in my 150 things about Canadian palaeontology is going to focus on the 2nd of 5 UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Canada, Dinosaur Provincial Park. Starting on 30/150: 30. Dinosaur Provincial Park (DPP) is located in southeastern Alberta, approximately 50 km from the city of Brooks. Despite the general misconception that Drumheller and the Royal … More 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 5 – Dinosaur Provincial Park #FossilFriday

150 things about Canadian palaeo – part 4, Canadian fossil names #FossilFriday

For my 4th post on 150 things about Canadian palaeo, I’m going to mention a few fossils that are named for places in Canada. Since there are so many fossil localities, and so many fossils, naturally there are a lot of Canadian fossil names. Here are a few of my favourites. Starting at 22/150: 22. … More 150 things about Canadian palaeo – part 4, Canadian fossil names #FossilFriday

150 things about Canadian palaeo – part 3, early palaeontologists #FossilFriday

Now onto week 3 of my 150 things about Canadian palaeontology. So far I’ve introduced you to some general bits about palaeo in Canada, and discussed the Burgess Shale. This week I’m going to talk a bit about the important people in some of the history of Canadian palaeontology. Not all are Canadian, but they are … More 150 things about Canadian palaeo – part 3, early palaeontologists #FossilFriday

Meet Allkaruen – the new Argentinian pterosaur

New pterosaurs, and especially new well preserved pterosaurs, are rarely found. As I’ve mentioned in the past, pterosaurs exhibit significant skeletal pneumaticity, meaning their bones are often filled with air. This is common in skulls of animals (like the sinuses in your own head), and is especially prevalent in pterosaurs. For this reason, pterosaur skulls … More Meet Allkaruen – the new Argentinian pterosaur

A ptiny pterosaur from the Late Cretaceous

Apologies for the title… Anyone who was with me on my last trip to Romania will remember the discussion of the potential for small pterosaurs in the Late Cretaceous, which rapidly turned into the search for “ptiny pterosaurs”. While I’ve always liked giant pterosaurs (who doesn’t think they are cool?!), I’ve recently become interested in … More A ptiny pterosaur from the Late Cretaceous

In Honour of Ada Lovelace – Female Palaeontologists

Today is Ada Lovelace Day. Many of you (like me initially) may not know who Ada Lovelace was, or what the day symbolises. Ada Lovelace was a British mathematician, who is widely regarded as being the first computer programmer. In 1842, she translated and expanded on an Italian article on the “Analytical Engine”, a machine … More In Honour of Ada Lovelace – Female Palaeontologists