Miguasha National Park – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 16

I have been slacking a bit (ok a lot) in getting through the 150 things about Canadian palaeo series, but I’m determined to get through 150 facts before the end of this year, while it’s still Canada’s 150th birthday year! For this post, I’m going to focus on Miguasha National Park, located in Quebec, and … More Miguasha National Park – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 16

Early Fossil Sites – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 15

Unfortunately, Canada’s 150th birthday came and went (July 1) and I didn’t manage to make it through my 150 things about Canadian palaeontology. Thesis writing got the better of me, and I just couldn’t keep up. However, now that I’m done, I’m going to finish up the series. This post is going to focus on … More Early Fossil Sites – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 15

Palaeobotany – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 14

I’ve disappeared for a few weeks while I’ve been working hard on my thesis, but now that I’ve finished a draft, it’s time for the next part in my ‘150 things about Canadian palaeo’ series! I’ve focused mostly on animals, but of course, there are also palaeobotany sites in Canada, and here’s a few facts … More Palaeobotany – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 14

Mistaken Point – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 13

This 150 things about Canadian palaeontology post is going to focus on the most recent fossil-related UNESCO World Heritage Site in Canada – Mistaken Point, Newfoundland and Labrador. Starting at 94/150: 94. Mistaken Point, on the island of Newfoundland, was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2016, just last year. It was first discovered in … More Mistaken Point – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 13

Significant Canadian fossils – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 11

For those that haven’t been following this post, here’s a brief recap. This year on July 1 is Canada’s 150th birthday. To celebrate, I’m writing 150 things about Canadian palaeontology, ranging from sites to people to museums. This post is going to focus on some of the important fossils that have been found in Canada, … More Significant Canadian fossils – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 11

Joggins Fossil Cliffs – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 10

This week, I’m going to introduce you to the 3rd of 5 UNESCO World Heritage Sites based on palaeontology that are found in Canada, the Joggins Fossil Cliffs. Starting at 70/150: 70. Joggins Fossil Cliffs is located on the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia, where more than 15 km of fossil-bearing cliffs and coastline are exposed. … More Joggins Fossil Cliffs – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 10

Palaeontology Museums – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 9

Things have been a bit hectic since I’ve arrived in Japan, so I missed last week’s post! Oops. But hopefully I can continue now, uninterrupted. This week I’m going to talk about some of the museums around Canada where you can see fossils. Starting at 57/150 (more than a third of the way there!): 57. … More Palaeontology Museums – 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 9

150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 8 – Dinosaur fossil localities

In case you’re new to this series or my blog, I’m writing 150 things about palaeontology in Canada in order to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday this July. To look back on previous posts, scroll to the bottom of this post to find a list of previous posts. For part 8, I’m going to talk about … More 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 8 – Dinosaur fossil localities

150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 5 – Dinosaur Provincial Park #FossilFriday

Post number 5 in my 150 things about Canadian palaeontology is going to focus on the 2nd of 5 UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Canada, Dinosaur Provincial Park. Starting on 30/150: 30. Dinosaur Provincial Park (DPP) is located in southeastern Alberta, approximately 50 km from the city of Brooks. Despite the general misconception that Drumheller and the Royal … More 150 things about Canadian palaeo, part 5 – Dinosaur Provincial Park #FossilFriday

150 things about Canadian palaeo – part 4, Canadian fossil names #FossilFriday

For my 4th post on 150 things about Canadian palaeo, I’m going to mention a few fossils that are named for places in Canada. Since there are so many fossil localities, and so many fossils, naturally there are a lot of Canadian fossil names. Here are a few of my favourites. Starting at 22/150: 22. … More 150 things about Canadian palaeo – part 4, Canadian fossil names #FossilFriday

150 things about Canadian palaeo – part 3, early palaeontologists #FossilFriday

Now onto week 3 of my 150 things about Canadian palaeontology. So far I’ve introduced you to some general bits about palaeo in Canada, and discussed the Burgess Shale. This week I’m going to talk a bit about the important people in some of the history of Canadian palaeontology. Not all are Canadian, but they are … More 150 things about Canadian palaeo – part 3, early palaeontologists #FossilFriday

150 things about Canadian palaeo – part 2, the Burgess Shale #FossilFriday

Last week, the first of our journey of 150 things about Canadian palaeontology, I introduced the history and some of the important facts palaeo in Canada. This week, I’m going to talk about one of the most significant finds, the Burgess Shale. Continuing with our numbering from before, so we don’t lose count… 8. The Burgess Shale is … More 150 things about Canadian palaeo – part 2, the Burgess Shale #FossilFriday

150 things about Canadian palaeontology, an intro. #FossilFriday

This year is a special year for Canada: July 1 marks our 150th “birthday”, or 150 years since we gained independence (mostly) from the United Kingdom, uniting the provinces of Canada (now Ontario and Quebec), Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick into the Dominion of Canada. To celebrate, I am going to be running a series … More 150 things about Canadian palaeontology, an intro. #FossilFriday

PhD Opportunity – pterosaur launch

Pterosaur biomechanics is something that I’m obviously very interested in, and the launch of pterosaurs is something that has been heavily debated. Traditionally, pterosaurs were thought to launch like birds, either running on their hindlimbs and jumping, or vertically launching into the air. However, it has been suggested more recently that they may have launched in … More PhD Opportunity – pterosaur launch